Marcus Wesson

An incestuous patriarch who formed his own cult, intertwining bizarre religious beliefs with extreme abuse and control.


Marcus Delon Wesson, born on August 22, 1946, is an American mass murderer and child rapist, known for creating a cult-like atmosphere within his own family, leading to a tragic and horrifying massacre. His story is one of manipulation, abuse, and delusion, deeply entwined with his unique interpretations of religion and morality.

Early Life and Background

Marcus Wesson’s life prior to the events that made him infamous was relatively unremarkable. He served as a medic during the Vietnam War and briefly worked as a bank teller. However, for about 30 years, he subsisted entirely on welfare checks. Wesson’s family life was chaotic and unstable, moving frequently across California and living in various conditions, including tents, motor homes, trailers, and even a boat.

Formation of the Cult

Wesson exerted complete control over his family, adopting a cult-like leadership. He held bizarre religious beliefs, claiming Jesus Christ was a vampire and asserting his own immortality. He referred to his children as “fledglings” and gave them “vampire names.” His teachings included twisted interpretations of the Bible, drawing parallels between the blood of Christ and vampires.

Incest and Abuse

Wesson began sexually abusing his daughters and nieces from a young age, eventually staging wedding ceremonies with them and justifying the incestuous relationships through his convoluted religious teachings. He claimed that incest was necessary to maintain a pure bloodline. His children were subjected to extreme physical and psychological control, and the environment within the family was one of fear and manipulation.

The Fresno Massacre

The situation escalated to a tragic climax on March 12, 2004. Following a dispute over child custody, Marcus Wesson killed nine of his children. The victims ranged from ages one to 25, including his daughters, granddaughters, and grand-nieces. The police discovered a grisly scene in the Wesson family home in Fresno, California, with the bodies stacked in a back bedroom.

Trial and Conviction

During his trial, Wesson’s defense claimed his 25-year-old daughter Sebhrenah committed the murders and then suicide. However, the jury found Wesson guilty of nine counts of first-degree murder and 14 counts of forcible rape and sexual molestation of his daughters and nieces. He was sentenced to death on June 27, 2005, and is currently on death row in San Quentin State Prison.